Praise Todd Howard

2022.01.25 10:15 ToddJustWorks Praise Todd Howard

Praise The Legendary Game Developer Todd Howard
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2022.01.25 10:15 Then-Guide-321 DM me for her socials, address and her pics

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2022.01.25 10:15 TrichoSearch Hair growth promotion effect of cedrol cream

Histological analyses indicated that in the cedrol ethanol group, most follicles of the C57BL/6 mice were in the catagen phase, whereas nearly 83% of hair follicles in the cedrol cream group remained in the anagen phase.
Taken together, our data strongly suggest that the cream formulation of cedrol has a stronger hair growth promotion effect, gave no irritation and was safe for topical administration.
Link to Study
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2022.01.25 10:15 ToddJustWorks Praise Todd Howard

Praise The Legendary Game Developer Todd Howard
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2022.01.25 10:15 ijarenm 馃惗馃悤 dog 馃暦锔忦煏革笍

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2022.01.25 10:15 mbhforum Is Lexapro really helping me?

I moved cross country earlier this year and I developed really bad sleep and anxiety during the process as it was very stressful moving the family with 2 kids in an extremely competitive real estate and rental market. I ended up seeing a doctor who prescribed Lexapro. I started off small 5MG and went up to 20MG. I ended up stopped Lexapro temporarily since I developed some bad acid reflux and nausea, which continued well after I stopped Lexapro.
My move was successful and we are settled in. Lexapro didn't seem to help my sleeping patterns, but I did find other ways to manage that with medical marijuana. I did notice Lexapro did help with me not obsessing over things which I tend to do. I stopped taking Lexapro once I moved to my new state, but have since recently started it up again due to work demands, etc.
I have IBS-D which is triggered sometimes by diet, other times by stress. I tend to get very anxious with long car rides, travel and pretty much situations where I am not in a comfortable place to use the bathroom. I had a bad episode once where I was trapped on the parkway and had a bad IBS attack and I do fear this one day will happen to me again. I was hoping Lexapro would help with this anxiousness and anxiety, but I don't think it has. For example, I had to drive into the office today, which is an hour commute and my anxiousness had me up at 4:45am and I had to take .25MG of Xanax to relax me for the drive.
I am now questioning whether I should remain on Lexapro as I am not sure it's really doing anything for me. I've been on it for now about 3 months (been on 20MG for about 6 weeks). Do I need to wait it out? Since I moved, my former doctor cannot consult me anymore, and I do have an appointment with a PCP in February for a physical which I plan to discuss. Would love to hear peoples experiences about Lexapro with similar situations that me.
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2022.01.25 10:15 Rcaroman How many subs can this cat video fit in?

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2022.01.25 10:15 UnlovedMisfit Opened Incognito from a browser logged into my work email, can they see anything ?

I think I already know the answer is no, but paranoia is here, I had my google chrome up and it was on my work profile that I use for work which is logged in with an email owned by my employer, I opened an incognito browser forgetting I was on my employers email account and searched one explicit term before realising and closing. There is nothing on my employer account web history, any chance they can still see it ? It is on my personal computer with no third party employer apps to monitor me.

thanks
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2022.01.25 10:15 BendyFry China gives 'Fight Club' new ending where authorities win

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2022.01.25 10:15 Holamoncat Runde

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2022.01.25 10:15 ToddJustWorks Praise Todd Howard

Praise The Legendary Game Developer Todd Howard
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2022.01.25 10:15 False_Masterpiece_23 砖专转 拽讟诇谞讬 诪诇讗 谞讬讜讚住 讻谞住讜! https://discord.gg/JyXffjaZ

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2022.01.25 10:15 ToddJustWorks Praise Todd Howard

Praise The Legendary Game Developer Todd Howard
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2022.01.25 10:15 madman1832 Minecraft The Playground S1E4 The Mechanic

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2022.01.25 10:15 NoisyBoyG Few paddocks tips and desert paddocks idea 馃

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2022.01.25 10:15 Deezel78 Void Shard Event?

Is there an event soon?
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2022.01.25 10:15 funchords Man Can鈥檛 Get Heart Transplant Because He鈥檚 Not Vaccinated Against COVID - CBS Boston

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2022.01.25 10:15 crytoloover Recording #03 COIN FUTURES BULLISH TRADE IN ALGORAND

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2022.01.25 10:15 ToddJustWorks Praise Todd Howard

Praise The Legendary Game Developer Todd Howard
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2022.01.25 10:15 jonfla The SCOTUS Culture War Docket - Conservative Supreme Court will hear the Harvard and UNC cases that could doom affirmative action

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2022.01.25 10:15 bestpodcastclips Longevity Researcher Dr. David Sinclair's Fasting Routine: 22 Hours Daily, 2 Days 1x/Month (2-minute audio clip)

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2022.01.25 10:15 RRRRadalacca11 Image this was real and not a wamo missinformation

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2022.01.25 10:15 _Hunter_420_ Is this even a good way? Please let me know!

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2022.01.25 10:15 FucknNews on my way to try it

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2022.01.25 10:15 RedmasterqQ What Scientists Learned by Putting Octopuses in MRI Machines.

" SUBSCRIBE
HomeNews & Opinion What Scientists Learned by Putting Octopuses in MRI Machines The size and complexity of cephalopod brain structures differ depending on the habitats the creatures occupy, a study finds.
Chloe Tenn
Jan 20, 2022 ABOVE: A blue-lined octopus (Hapalochlaena fasciata) 漏 ISTOCK.COM, NIGEL MARSH Whether they鈥檙e predicting the outcomes of sports games or opening jars, the intelligence of octopuses and their cephalopod kin has fascinated avid sports fans and scientists alike (not that the two groups are mutually exclusive). However, insights into the animals鈥 brains have been limited, as structural data has come from low-tech methods such as dissection.
Wen-Sung Chung, a University of Queensland Brain Institute neurobiologist who focuses on marine species, explains that octopuses have 鈥減robably the biggest centralized brain in invertebrates,鈥 with multiple layers and lobes. Some species have more than 500 million neurons, he adds鈥攃ompared to around 70 million in lab mice鈥攎aking cephalopods especially intriguing as models for neuroscience.
Chung and his colleagues decided to bring cephalopod neuroscience into the 21st century: using cutting-edge MRI, they probed the brains of four cephalopod species. They were especially interested in exploring whether cephalopod brain structures reflect the environments they live in. Indeed, the team reports numerous structural differences between species that live on reefs and those that dwell in deeper waters in a November 18 Current Biology paper.
WEN-SUNG CHUNG Giovanna Ponte, an evolutionary marine biologist at Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn Napoli in Italy who was not involved with the work, tells The Scientist that while this isn鈥檛 the first study to look for neurological correlates underlying ecological differences in cephalopods, it offers a new technological approach to investigating these animals鈥 brain morphology and diversity, and most importantly, 鈥渋s the first time that there is . . . a comparative approach between different species.鈥
Chung and his team sampled four species of cephalopods representing divergent ecological niches: the deep-dwelling vampire squid (Vampyroteuthis infernalis), the solitary and nocturnal blue-lined octopus (Hapalochlaena fasciata), and two diurnal reef dwellers, the algal octopus (Abdopus capricornicus), and the day octopus (Octopus cyanea). At least three specimens of each species were obtained and euthanized so that they could be imaged by MRI, allowing researchers to compare the shape, size, and folding of the animals鈥 neurological structures.
A diurnal day octopus (Octopus cyanea) WEN-SUNG CHUNG One of the most pronounced differences the researchers describe is that the optic lobes of the nocturnal H. fasciata and deep-sea V. infernalis are smaller and less complex than the optic lobes of the diurnal A. capricornicus and O. cyanea. The diurnal species also have much larger vertical lobes, a part of the brain involved in learning and memory in octopuses. In fact, their vertical lobes are almost twice the size of the other two species and more folded鈥攅ach had seven of the folds known as gyri instead of the five typically reported in other octopuses. Chung likens the presence of gyri in the octopuses鈥 brains to wrinkles in human and other primate brains and says such gyri are a useful indicator of brain complexity.
Shuichi Shigeno, an Osaka University neuroscience researcher who specializes in the brain evolution of cephalopods and was not involved with this study, notes that the paper鈥檚 observations, particularly around brain folding, are novel. Current knowledge of octopus brains is primarily based on literature from the 1970s, he says. 鈥淣obody has studied the details of folding [in] the cerebral cortex brain structure in octopus [before], and Chung has discovered interesting results鈥 by employing very modern techniques, he tells The Scientist.
Chung and colleagues suggest that the larger size and number of gyri in the optic and vertical lobes of diurnal species correlate to the complicated visual and cognitive tasks these species perform in their relatively shallow, bright habitats. For instance, O. cyanea and other reef-dwelling octopuses are known to collaborate with fish in hunting.
Jennifer Mather, a University of Lethbridge cephalopod behavioral researcher who was not involved in this study but is currently compiling a database of what is known about the brains and behaviors of cephalopods that will include data from it, calls the paper鈥檚 focus on species from the Indo-Pacific an 鈥渋nteresting supplement鈥 that 鈥渉elps put another piece in the puzzle,鈥 as previous work was done on European species. Mather adds that while the study delves into the anatomical characteristics of the brains very thoroughly, there was very little on behavior. 鈥淚f we want to do a brain-behavior relationship, we have to have good coverage of both,鈥 she says.
An algal octopus (Abdopus capricornicus) WEN-SUNG CHUNG Shigeno agrees with Mather鈥檚 point, but notes that little is known about the animals鈥 behaviors, and experimental studies are complicated by the fact that many octopus species live in environments such as coral reefs that are legally protected. He says he鈥檇 like to see further investigation into specific brain parts, pointing out that other types of imaging, such as electron microscopy, could provide higher resolution images and 鈥渕ore detailed neural structures鈥 than MRI.
The paper raises new questions about biological plasticity and adaptation, Ponte says. She would like to see more research on the animals鈥 other brain regions, such as their frontal lobes, and how compartmentalization of neurons within lobes may relate to specialization.
Chung agrees that more research is needed. This is just 鈥渢he very beginning,鈥 he says, adding that he hopes this work inspires other cephalopod researchers. He also says that he鈥檇 like to image the brains of living octopuses to get functional data, though he considers such work 鈥渁 really, really long term goal.鈥
Keywords: Australiabehaviorbrainbrain imagingbrain scancephalopodcomparative researchcoral reefsGreat Barrier Reefimage analysismarine biologyMRIMRI scanningneuroscienceNewsoctopusoptic lobestudy storyzoology
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